Michael Angelo Covino and real-life greatest pal Kyle Marvin play two best buds who find their relationship tested after an act of betrayal in “The Climb.”, Go ahead, call her a spoiled celeb kid. Coherence was hard to establish but the memory prompts, the lurid colourization and off-beat editing held the attention. It occupies a genre all to itself. “The Image Book” is an 85-minute cinematic brainstorm, a swirling, dazzling, maddening frenzy of disconnected sights and sounds that have been compiled and arranged according to a rhythmic and rhetorical logic that only its maker can fully divine. The Image Book is undoubted flawed; it is very much imperfect. The colors are so oversaturated that classic Hollywood film clips (many of them from films that Godard and his New Wave compatriots praised as critics) seem as if they could be 1980s music videos that had been recorded on VHS, badly damaged in a flood, then somehow inexplicably restored and added to Godard's hard drive. Or is it a meditation on the movement in moving pictures? America’s separate information universes will make it hard to end the “grim era of demonization.”, Review: Vince Vaughn swaps bodies with a teen girl in high-concept slasher comedy ‘Freaky’, Vince Vaughn and Kathryn Newton are fun to watch in “Freaky,” a high school-set horror comedy that could’ve been called “Freaky Friday the 13th.”, Review: ‘Come Away’ goes down a rabbit hole and never, never comes back. By the time it ends, it has ruminated on the rise of the image, the fall of the word and the pulverization of every form of information into a nonstop stream of "content;" drawn connections between the mechanization of genocide during the Holocaust and colonization; created a kind of self-contained film-within-a-film, romanticizing the Arabic-speaking world through four decades' worth of movie clips; and handed viewers a continuous analogy for the film's own stylistic techniques by grouping together dozens of clips from movies involving trains ("trains of thought," perhaps?). We wondered how, in total darkness, colours of such intensity could emerge within us. It is currently seeking distribution. ...a work, both surprising and confounding, that indicates the lyrical and poetic potential of montage-based cinema. But on the basis of “The Image Book,” that doesn’t mean he’s done with them yet. Forgot your password? Individual fragments lodge in your memory: a teenager on a shooting spree in Gus Van Sant’s “Elephant,” a horrific spectacle of degradation in Pier Paolo Pasolini’s “Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom,” a conflagration from Godard’s own apocalyptic “Weekend.”. In a soft, low voice. The image freezes. Easy to dislike at times but hard to dismiss, The Image Book is a difficult, contradictory, complex work. It weaves images from the long, interminable history of conflict in the Middle East — some from movies, some from ISIS videos — into a despairing screed on not just the inevitability of violence but also the unknowability of the truth. Check box if your review contains spoilers, Do you still remember how, long ago, we trained our thoughts? In the final seconds of “The Image Book (aka Image and Word),” Jean-Luc Godard’s rapid-fire montage of movies and media set to his fragmented pronouncements, a dancer twirls around and falls to the floor. As history spirals off into oblivion, there’s nothing left to grab. Godard let us a piece of art, beautiful on its colorful images between the visions of light in a mad mad world opposed to the breaking point on the oversaturated images from movie classics. Is this about the power of arrangement? True, few of the cutup crew ever had the depth of knowledge or stylistic panache that Godard – one of the last remaining masters of the 20th century's most vibrant art forms – brings to the screen. The fifth and longest chapter — which borrows its title from Michael Snow’s 1971 avant-garde landmark, “La Région Centrale” — shines a tinted spotlight on the Arab world. Olivier’s “Hamlet,” Cocteau’s “Beauty and the Beast” coexist with observations (some more facile than others) such as describing the Arab world as one of “secrecy and landscapes.” Or: “I prefer poor people because they are the defeated.”. There's more inspired, original, daring technique in its 85-minute running time than in most movies. Most often we'd start from a dream. Amid coronavirus surge in California, 11 counties fall backward in reopening plans. No one shades Cazzie David better than Cazzie David. Do you still remember how, long ago, we trained our thoughts? Not only does the less than novice image look atrocious (and we are to believe this is a great artist of cinema?! Glib enough for you? It’s through exercising a certain kind of madness that the film connects even at its most disjointed. In interviews about his movies he comes across as alternately prankish and sour, well-read and a bit of a charlatan, somewhat like Orson Welles back in the day. Narrated by Godard in an insinuating low growl clouded by cigar smoke and skepticism, “The Image Book” is his latest audio-visual collage. “The Image Book” is an 85-minute cinematic brainstorm, a swirling, dazzling, maddening frenzy of disconnected sights and sounds that have been compiled and …