He was an object of pity and terror to the whole gang of slaves, and in his wretched case we saw, each of us, our own lot, if we should live to be as old. [On being sold:] Did one of the many by-standers, who were looking at us so carelessly, think of the pain that wrung the hearts of the negro woman and her young ones? I came trembling: she stripped and flogged me long and severely with the cow-skin; as long as she had strength to use the lash, for she did not give over till she was quite tired.—When my master came home at night, she told him of my fault; and oh, frightful! We're in her head as she tells us her sad tale of her life. Also, I didn’t like the fact that how Mary was being sold to by the slave owners more than once. She wished it to be done, she said, that good people in England might hear from a slave what a slave had felt and suffered; and a letter of her late master's, which will be found in the Supplement, induced me to accede to her wish without farther delay. The sights and sounds of day to day torment were also torture to the mind. No, no! The way everything was described made all the words come to life in my mind. All slaves want to be free—to be free is very sweet. Mary Prince (c. 1788-after 1833) was born into slavery in Devonshire Parish, Bermuda. This disconnect, or possibly a translation process?, that this book underwent has altered its meaning. This page was last edited on 26 October 2020, at 20:23. I can't imagine being in her place and going through what she went through, I can't imagine staying quiet to a white master if they treated me that way. It is now an iteration of what the book itself claims to be. It was. No other good they may get can make up for that. This is a difficult book to rate and review, owing to its subject matter, its status as truth, and the editorial interference that I felt threatened to define it. I love the book and of course I love Mary Prince character, but I hate Mr. and Mrs. Woods. Overall, not a bad read . But they put a cloak about the truth. But who cared for that? Share with your friends. It's not for me to judge the quality and the storytelling of a slave narrative because, at the end of the day, it's a lived experience, and it's utterly abominable no matter how it is written. ... Oh, those white people have small hearts who can only feel for themselves. Mary Prince (c. 1788-after 1833) was born into slavery in Devonshire Parish, Bermuda. The jar was already cracked with an old deep crack that divided it in the middle, and in turning it upside down to empty it, it parted in my hand. The master's refusal to allow the slave girl to marry the man of her choice, a free black man, and the pivotal moment when the slave decides to rebel and take her stand for freedom are just some of the trials and tribulations that occur in her story. She had to endure many hardships in her life, like being separated from her family and dehumanized; she was treated as if she were an animal. It's true Mary Prince was literate, but not enough to write a book. Oh the. I ran crying to my mistress, "O mistress, the jar has come in two." I was surprised to find the little volume still in print, but Mary Prince's troubled and difficult life as a slave became a document that ultimately created world change. It is now an iteration of what the book itself claims to be. Subsequent to her escape, when she was living in London, England, she wrote her slave narrative The History of Mary Prince (1831), which was the first account of the life of a black woman to be published in the United Kingdom. I can't imagine being in her place and going through what she went through, I can't imagine staying quiet to a white master if they treated me that way. I have been a slave myself — I know what slaves feel — I can tell by myself what other slaves feel, and by what they have told me. My heart throbbed with grief and terror so violently, that I pressed my hands quite tightly across my breast, but I could not keep it still, and it continued to leap as though it would burst out of my body. It was a sad parting; one went one way, one another, and our poor mammy went home with nothing. The morals of the time insist that you can only tell an improving story if you cut out what offends you, and only an improving story is desirable. An important book and a landmark publication as the first literary work from Bermuda. I saw everything come to life, and all i could think of was the pain and humiliation I would've felt. Subjected to bodily and sexual abuse by subsequent masters, she was bought and sold several times before she was ultimately freed. While she was later living in London, her autobiography, The History of Mary Prince (1831), was the first account of the life of a black woman to be published in the United Kingdom. Mary Prince, a slave, was the first black woman to publish an account of her life in Britain - an account so brutal that few believed it. Who else has sold more than 200 million... Born in Bermuda to a house slave in 1788, Mary Prince suffered the first of many soul-shattering experiences in her life when she was separated from her parents and siblings at the age of twelve. If you have not made them so, you have wronged them. Her narratives are very sad, so prepare to have a box of tissue on your side. In total she was telling what she was going through, she was suffering so much and being treated like object not as human being. I would recommend this book to all students’s who are searching for more primary sources on slavery. I cannot easily forget it. Mary Prince certainly succeeds in her goal of communicating the horrors of slavery and that's what really matters here. She was being sold to and by the slaves owners more than once. I never heard a slave say so. I endeavour to keep down my fretting, and to leave all to him, for he knows what is good for me better than I know myself”. It's not for me to judge the quality and the storytelling of a slave narrative because, at the end of the day, it's a lived experience, and it's utterly abominable no matter how it is written. She had to endure many hardships in her life, like being separated from her family and dehumanized; she was treated as if she were an animal. They tie up slaves like hogs—moor them up like cattle, and they lick them, so as hogs, or cattle, or horses never were flogged;—and yet they come home and say, and make some good people believe, that slaves don't want to get out of slavery. She had to endure many hardships in her life, like being separated from her family and dehumanized; she was treated as if she were an animal. She persevered up to the end and even though she didn’t completely get her fairytale ending, Mary received part of what she wanted. No what brought me undone was the abolitionist's prim certification, by three 'respectable' ladies, who had 'examined' Mary Prince, that her scars were, indeed, present. Mary Prince’s life was intriguing, heart wrenching, and harrowing. Mary was beaten and put to shame for the slightest errors. Quotations by Prince Harry, English Royalty, Born September 15, 1984. This woman, whose courage, determination, strength of mind and spirit comes very clearly even through the edited narrative, is reduced to a s. The point when this book bought me undone was right at the end, past the horrors of being a personal punching bag, past the body-breaking decade in the salt mines, past the abusive family. Our motto is: Don't quote it if you can't source it. The History of Mary Prince is such a great book because it teaches us the morals and values that slaves learned once they went through this hard situations but also it shows us the conflict that woman faced by their masters and what woman went through to get freedoum.Henry Louis Gates jr did such a good job on providing us with elements that actually make us feel like we are in the slaves shoes but also he showed us how the african americans were hated in their socites.But today we are exploring. However, even though she had many different masters and the majority treated her badly she didn’t give up on the fact that she wanted her freedom. The life of this west Indian slave includes agonizing scenes of physical abuse at the hands of both a slave master and a jealous slave mistress. However, even though she had many different masters and the majority treated her badly she didn’t give up on the fact that she wanted her freedom. The edition I read is clearly meant to be assigned reading in a class, but I can hardly imagine the teacher--or even professor--who would dare assign it. A harrowing but important personal account of abuse and degradation. Subsequent to her escape, when she was living in London, England, she and Thomas Pringle wrote her slave narrative The History of Mary Prince (1831), which was the first account of the life of a black woman to be published in the United Kingdom. I, as the eldest, stood first, Hannah next to me, then Dinah; and our mother stood beside, crying over us. Oh those white people have small hearts who can only feel for themselves. Sometimes you have to keep things very close to your own chest in your life, or this life. I would rather go into my grave!" This was a story narrated by and former slave Mary Prince. THE HISTORY OF MARY PRINCE In 1829, encouraged by Pringle, Prince arranged to have her life story transcribed by Susanna Strickland. The life of this west Indian slave includes agonizing scenes of physical abuse at the hands of both a slave master and a jealous slave mistress. The edition I read is clearly meant to be assigned reading in a class, but I can hardly imagine the teacher--or even professor--who would dare assign it. However, the reason why. Quote of the day. Mary was born to enslaved parents in Bermuda in 1788. He threw her down on the ground, and after beating her severely, he took her up in his arms and flung her among the prickly-pear bushes, which are all covered over with sharp venomous prickles. She was being sold to and by the slaves owners more than once. I saw too much of it afterward. I have often wondered how English people can go out into the West Indies and act in such a beastly manner. In page 280, it said “Mrs. II (an African American Heritage Book).